Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Robert Ingersoll on the design argument

A man finds a watch and it is so wonderful that he concludes that it must have had a maker. He finds the maker and he is so much more wonderful than the watch that he says he must have had a maker. Then he finds God, the maker of the man, and he is so much more wonderful than the man that he could not have had a maker. This is what the lawyers call a departure in pleading. 
— Robert G. Ingersoll, The Works of Robert Ingersoll (New York, 1900), vol. 4, p. 27. As quoted in Susan Jacoby, The Great Agnostic (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013), pp. 37.

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